pregnancy injuries death

For many American women, childbirth is filled with anxiety. But dying while giving birth isn’t typically top of their mind. 

Until recently, the U.S. has become the most dangerous place for women to give birth. And the latest report by NPR.ORG indicates that pregnancy-related deaths in the U.S. are still rising

 What seems alarming is that black mothers often face the highest risk of hospital negligence. And according to the CDC, 50% of these deaths are preventable, an indication that medical malpractice could be involved. 

Why More and More U.S. Women Die from Childbirth Each Year?

Scrappy Mortality Data

Around 700 to 800 women in the U.S. die each year from pregnancy-related injuries. The deaths occur during pregnancy, day of delivery, and up to 43-365 days postpartum. In 2015, the estimated mortality rate was 26.4 for every 100,000 live births.

This problem remained unnoticed for several years due to unreliable maternal mortality data. No effort was made to address the issue since nobody knew the real mortality rates. The last time the CDC and the NCHS published official maternal mortality data was in 2007.

Addressing Preventable Deaths

One of the key findings from a 2018 CDC report on U.S. maternal mortality is that 2 out 3 deaths were preventable. The major causes of preventable deaths are medical errors, ineffective treatments, and hospital negligence.

While the leading causes of death vary by racial types, 50% of the deaths were caused by:

  • Infection
  • Hemorrhage 
  • Cardiomyopathy and
  • Cardiovascular & coronary conditions

A majority of non-Hispanic white women die due to mental health problems. For non-Hispanic black women, the leading causes of death are Preeclampsia and Eclampsia, and Embolism. 

With California’s success in reducing the number of pregnancy-related injuries and death, the Alliance for Innovation on Maternal Health (AIM) has urged hospitals across the U.S. to follow the “bundles” of best practices.

So, what is it exactly?

In an obstetric hemorrhage situation, hospitals must have emergency carts with medicines and equipment which will be used in response to a mother who is hemorrhaging. Also, there should be a checklist on the cart that describes how to identify and handle hemorrhage.   

Facing the Toughest Issue

The biggest challenge of all is eliminating racial disparity gaps, particularly in maternal deaths. More non-Hispanic black women continue to die as a result of pregnancy-related injuries. The rate is 3 to 4 higher than non-Hispanic white women despite any underlying risk factors.

Structural racism and racial bias in our healthcare system lead to medical malpractice and death. A report by the Emergency Care Research Institute (ECRI) shows that more black adults die from stroke than white adults.

Other studies likewise show that many healthcare workers don’t take health complaints seriously if they come from non-white patients. This practice leads to medical errors such as delayed treatments, misdiagnosis, and others.

Contact a Medical Negligence Lawyer Experienced in Pregnancy-related Injuries Cases

The aftermath of pregnancy-related injuries can last a lifetime. Both mother and baby must deal with lifelong injuries and other medical conditions. 

What’s more, hospital bills can pile up. And family members have to cope with trauma or grieve if a loved one has died. On top of that, working through piles of paperwork to hold hospital healthcare workers accountable can be overwhelming. 

A medical malpractice attorney’s guidance is invaluable in the medical malpractice lawsuit process. 

For many American women, childbirth is filled with anxiety. But dying while giving birth isn’t typically top of their mind. 

Until recently, the U.S. has become the most dangerous place for women to give birth. And the latest report by NPR.ORG indicates that pregnancy-related deaths in the U.S. are still rising

What seems alarming is that black mothers often face the highest risk of hospital negligence. And according to the CDC, 50% of these deaths are preventable, an indication that medical malpractice could be involved. 

Why More and More U.S. Women Die from Childbirth Each Year?

Scrappy Mortality Data

Around 700 to 800 women in the U.S. die each year from pregnancy-related injuries. The deaths occur during pregnancy, day of delivery, and up to 43-365 days postpartum. In 2015, the estimated mortality rate was 26.4 for every 100,000 live births.

This problem remained unnoticed for several years due to unreliable maternal mortality data. No effort was made to address the issue since nobody knew the real mortality rates. The last time the CDC and the NCHS published official maternal mortality data was in 2007.

Addressing Preventable Deaths

One of the key findings from a 2018 CDC report on U.S. maternal mortality is that 2 out 3 deaths were preventable. The major causes of preventable deaths are medical errors, ineffective treatments, and hospital negligence.

While the leading causes of death vary by racial types, 50% of the deaths were caused by:

  • Infection
  • Hemorrhage 
  • Cardiomyopathy and
  • Cardiovascular & coronary conditions

A majority of non-Hispanic white women die due to mental health problems. For non-Hispanic black women, the leading causes of death are Preeclampsia and Eclampsia, and Embolism. 

With California’s success in reducing the number of pregnancy-related injuries and death, the Alliance for Innovation on Maternal Health (AIM) has urged hospitals across the U.S. to follow the “bundles” of best practices.

So, what is it exactly?

In an obstetric hemorrhage situation, hospitals must have emergency carts with medicines and equipment which will be used in response to a mother who is hemorrhaging. Also, there should be a checklist on the cart that describes how to identify and handle hemorrhage.   

Facing the Toughest Issue

The biggest challenge of all is eliminating racial disparity gaps, particularly in maternal deaths. More non-Hispanic black women continue to die as a result of pregnancy-related injuries. The rate is 3 to 4 higher than non-Hispanic white women despite any underlying risk factors.

Structural racism and racial bias in our healthcare system lead to medical malpractice and death. A report by the Emergency Care Research Institute (ECRI) shows that more black adults die from stroke than white adults.

Other studies likewise show that many healthcare workers don’t take health complaints seriously if they come from non-white patients. This practice leads to medical errors such as delayed treatments, misdiagnosis, and others.

    

Contact a Medical Negligence Lawyer Experienced in Pregnancy-related Injuries Cases

The aftermath of pregnancy-related injuries can last a lifetime. Both mother and baby must deal with lifelong injuries and other medical conditions. 

What’s more, hospital bills can pile up. And family members have to cope with trauma or grieve if a loved one has died. On top of that, working through piles of paperwork to hold hospital healthcare workers accountable can be overwhelming. 

A medical malpractice attorney’s guidance is invaluable in the medical malpractice lawsuit process. call Rosenberg, Minc, Falkoff & Wolff, LLP today at 1-800-660-2264 or contact us online for a free and confidential consultation.

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